2017 Certificate: 12

Synopsis

When an American pilot (Chris Pine) crash-lands on her island paradise of Themyscira, supernaturally-gifted Amazonian princess Diana (Gal Gadot) learns that a massive conflict - World War One - is raging in the outside world. She immediately opts to join him and travels to London to contribute her skills to the fight. Move over boys - this is superior superheroine fare.

Director

  • Patty Jenkins

Cast

  • Gal Gadot

  • Chris Pine

  • Robin Wright

  • Connie Nielsen

  • Elena Anaya

  • Ewen Bremner

  • Lucy Davis

  • David Thewlis

Review

Apart from her brief but winning appearance in Batman V Superman, this marks the long-overdue cinematic debut of perhaps the most iconic female superhero (who's not somebody's cousin that is). 

Wonder Woman, the film that bears her name, is a classic wartime adventure movie with an enlivening blend of Greek mythology and gender politics.

Diana (Gal Gadot) is an Amazon Princess, living and training with her "sisters" - including her mother, Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen), and fierce aunt, General Antiope (Robin Wright) - on the paradisiacal Mediterranean island of Themyscira. 

An American soldier, Steve Rogers - sorry, make that Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) - crash-lands just offshore with a German vessel close on his tail. 

Once the interlopers have been dispatched by way of spear, arrow, and lots of slow-mo leaping, the Amazons learn of the state of the world. The First World War rages on with no signs of abating. 

When Steve calls it "the war to end all wars", Diana senses the influence of their arch-nemesis, Ares, God of War and, armed with a "god-killer" sword, her bullet-deflecting bracelets, and the Lasso of Truth, sets out to destroy him once and for all.

Director Patty Jenkins has a definite feel for the material - the need to balance lightness with sincerity; entertainment with definite stakes. 

More than anything, Wonder Woman is a triumph of tone: sincerely heroic without being over-earnest, funny without being goofy; the humour more than token; the emotion earned genuinely.

Rob Wallis